Highlands

HIGHLANDS
HIGHLANDS
HIGHLANDS
HIGHLANDS

The rugged Highlands of Scotland provide many an inspiration for artists and poets in the past - and distillers too.
The mixed landscape gives a mixed range of whiskies too - dry and fruity such as Glengoyne, smoke influence from Ardmore or a classic ‘spirited’ dram, such as Glenmorangie.

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DistilleryRegionNameAge / Yr / VintageABVSizePriceBuyhf:att:pa_distillery

The Highlands

The Highland region is the largest geographical whisky area in Scotland. Traditionally, the Islands are counted in this area, however, we keep them separate.

Due to the large geography this area represents, its whiskies are not easy to categorise. If we were generalising, we would say they are robust, full-bodied single malts – but they also present different characteristics depending on the distillery and location. 

The landscape from which these whiskies come could be stunning, misty mountains, or open fields and lakes. Some can be peaty and smoky, some present a mouth filling robust dram whereas others can be surprisingly delicate.

It’s said that some of the purest water running through Scotland is in the Highlands – and that is surely going to have an effect on the final product. (Discuss/debate….!)

To try and put some semblance and order to the region, we would go as far to say that distilleries in the northern Highlands generally produce whisky with full-bodied, sweet malts with cereal notes; in the south, whiskies tend to be lighter, fruity and dry. Single malts from Aberdeenshire in the east are full-bodied, dry and fruity compared with the western Highlands, which are peated with strong maritime influences.

Highland Whisky
Highland
Lowland Whisky
Lowland
Speyside
Islay Whisky
Islay
Campbeltown Whisky
Campbeltown
Island Whisky
Islands